Miles Davis – Lonely Fire (1970)

Lonely Fire is recorded 27 January 1970 in Columbia Studio B, and appears on the album Big Fun.

Lineup:  Miles Davis – trumpet / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Bennie Maupin – bass clarinet / Khalil Balakrishna – sitar, Indian instruments / Chick Corea – electric piano / Joe Zawinul – electric piano, Farfisa organ / Dave Holland – double bass / Harvey Brooks – Fender bass guitar / Jack DeJohnette – drums / Billy Cobham – drums / Airto Moreira – Indian instruments, percussion

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John Coltrane – Consequences (1965)

Consequenses comes after Love on Coltranes fabulous album Meditations, recorded in Van Gelder Studio the 23rd of November 1965.

The year 1965 was a turning point in the life of John Coltrane. It was at this point that he crossed the line into the free jazz arena that he had been approaching since the early ’60s. Besides his landmark Ascension, no album better illustrates this than the awe-inspiring Meditations. [source]

If one expects music to be “pretty,” go buy some Kenny G. But surely Coltrane knew that Meditations and the other recordings he made during this period were anything but pretty. He was trying to do something else with music: to reach and touch and communicate human emotions, human conditions, of more importance, depth, and lasting significance than prettiness. Especially in his “late period,” he thought that his music meant something: he thought it performed a function that mattered. Of course, this sort of thing was in the air. Archie Shepp was lecturing in Down Beat, everyone was recording music about freedom, and it was hard not to have contempt for music that didn’t try to matter. [source]

All songs written by John Coltrane.

  1. “The Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost” – 12:51
  2. “Compassion” – 6:50
  3. “Love” – 8:09
  4. “Consequences” – 9:11
  5. “Serenity” – 3:28

John Coltrane – tenor saxophone / Pharoah Sanders – tenor saxophone / McCoy Tyner – piano / Jimmy Garrison – double bass / Elvin Jones – drums / Rashied Ali – drums

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Jimmy Giuffre, Paul Bley and Steve Swallow – Stretching Out (1961)

Stretching Out is from the album Emphasis & Flight by Jimmy Giuffre, Paul Bley and Steve Swallow, recorded 7th and 23rd November, 1961 in Germany.

At a time when the leading edge of mainstream jazz was pulling through modal jazz into hard bop, Jimmy Giuffre was headed in another direction. His early trios were simultaneously polite and experimental, an unusual combination that revealed both his cool roots and his fearlessness in stepping over the cliff. Nowhere were these qualities more evident than on his early-’60s trio records alongside pianist Paul Bley and bassist Steve Swallow. [source]

Jimmy Giuffre – Clarinet
Paul Bley – Piano
Steve Swallow – Double Bass


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Bud Powell – Un Poco Loco (1949)

Un Poco Loco [Alternate Take No. 2] (English translation: “A Little Crazy”) is recorded on May the 1st, 1951 and appears on the album The Amazing Bud Powell, Volume 1 from 1955.

While the song “Un Poco Loco” has been identified as musically outstanding, it has also been discussed as culturally significant. According to Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop, although Afro-Cuban jazz had been introduced in the 1940s by such artists as Dizzy Gillespie and Machito, “Un Poco Loco” is a significant marker in the establishment of this musical genre, as it revealed “the Afro-Cuban turn settling into bebop’s acceptable field of rhetorical conventions”.  More than Afro-Cuban, the authors of that book detect what they describe as a “Pan-African” musical influence in the composition’s repetition, harmony and cyclic solo that, while not as obviously Afro-international as Gillespie’s “A Night in Tunisia’, “certainly signaled a ‘blackness’ that became part of the language of subsequent expressions of modern jazz.” The book Jazz 101 indicates that Powell’s performances of this material in 1951 was “all the more astonishing” in its “level of creativity, and even authenticity” because little was known at the time of African music or how Latin music (aside from the Cuban influence) could be applied to jazz. According to Yanow, in Afro-Cuban Jazz: The Essential Listening Companion, this composition was Powell’s only involvement with Afro-Cuban Jazz. [source]

Personnel:  Bud Powell – Piano / Curley Russell – Double Bass / Max Roach – Drums

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John Coltrane – The Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost (1965)

The Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost is first track on the album Medtiations by John Coltrane, recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, on November 23, 1965.

The year 1965 was a turning point in the life of John Coltrane. It was at this point that he crossed the line into the free jazz arena that he had been approaching since the early ’60s. Besides his landmark Ascension, no album better illustrates this than the awe-inspiring Meditations. Coltrane’s regular quartet — McCoy Tyner (piano), Jimmy Garrison (bass), and Elvin Jones (drums) — is expanded here with second drummer Rashied Ali (who assumed Jones’ spot after this album) and saxophonist Pharoah Sanders. This conglomeration produces some dense textures, especially in the epic first track “The Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost.” This sonic hurricane is a 13-minute outpouring of spiritual emotion that is at once compelling and exhausting. [source]

John Coltrane – Tenor Saxophone / Rashied Ali – Drums / Jimmy Garrison – Double Bass / Elvin Jones – Drums / Pharoah Sanders – Tenor Saxophone / McCoy Tyner – Piano

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Aldo Romano, Louis Sclavis, Henri Texier – Annobon (1994 – 1995)

From the album Le Querrec: Carnet de Routes by the trio of Romano/Sclavis/Texier, recorded and mixed from 1994 to 1995 at Studio de la Maison de la Culture d’Amiens.

This recording from the West African tours of the Romano/Sclavis/Texier trio in the early ’90s is one in a series of three. That this band played in Africa and was documented by photographer Guy LeQuerrec was remarkable in and of itself. These cats are all composers who know the strengths of each their band members. When melody lines come off Sclavis’ horn and are tied in separate octaves to Texier’s bass playing, creating a new chromatic color to the proceedings, such as on “Bororo Dance” and “Flash Memoire,” listeners get to hear music in the process of being created from nothing but the abilities of its makers. [source]

Louis Sclavis – Clarinet, Soprano Saxophone / Henri Texier -Double Bass / Aldo Romano -Drums / Guy Le Querrec – Photography

watch photos by Guy Le Querrec in Africa here

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