Nina Simone – Feeling Good (1965)

“Feeling Good” (also known as “Feelin’ Good”) is a song written by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse for the 1964 musical “The Roar Of The Greasepaint – The Smell Of The Crowd” and has since been recorded by many artists, including Muse, Sammy Davis Jr., Bobby Darin, Traffic, Michael Bublé, The Pussycat Dolls, George Michael, John Barrowman, John Coltrane, Toše Proeski, Frank Sinatra Jr., and Adam Lambert. Perhaps the most famous version was recorded by Nina Simone, and first appeared on her 1965 album “I Put A Spell On You”.

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Ella Fitzgerald – Stairway To The Stars (1959)

From the album Hello, Love, 1960 studio album by the American jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald, recorded over two sessions in 1957 and 1959.

Ella Fitzgerald – Vocals / Frank DeVol –  Conductor / Milt Bernhart – Trombone / George Roberts, Lloyd Ulyate, Pete Candoli – Trumpet / Harry “Sweets” Edison, Ray Linn, George Werth, Clint Neagley – Alto Saxophone / Ben Webster – Tenor Saxophone / Bert Gassman – Oboe / Arnold Koblentz, Gordon Schoneberg, Skeets Herfurt – Woodwind / Joseph J. Koch, Ernest Romersa, Norm Herzberg – Bassoon / Kenneth Lowman, Jack Marsh, Martin Ruderman – Flute / Sylvia Ruderman, Milt Holland – percussion / Barney Kessel – Guitar / Abe Luboff – Double Bass / Joe Mondragon, Philip Stephens, Alvin Stoller – Drums / Arnold Ross – Piano / Dorothy Remsen – Harp

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Jeanne Lee & Ran Blake – Worry Now Later (1989)

From the CD You Stepped out of a Cloud by Jeanne Lee and Ran Blake, recorded, August the 11th, 1989. Originally Worry Now Later is composed by Thelonious Monk. Lyrics by Margo Guryan.

In 1961, both pianist Ran Blake and singer Jeanne Lee (helped out on two cuts by bassist George Duvivier) made their recording debut with a set of coolly emotional duets. Nearly 28 years later, they had a reunion for this Owl CD, showing the musical growth they had experienced while still sounding quite recognizable; both had found their own musical paths early on. Half of the numbers on the set are originals (including Lee’s “I Like Your Style”), but it is generally the fresh renditions of standards that are most memorable, including a haunting “You Stepped Out of a Dream,” “Where Are You,” “You Go to My Head” and “Alone Together.” Blake and Lee should work together more often. [source]

Ran Blake – Piano / Jeanne Lee – Vocals

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Jeanne Lee – Yeh Come T’ Beh (1974)

Yeh Come T’ Beh is second track on the album Conspiracy by Jeanne Lee.

Jeanne Lee (January 29, 1939 – October 25, 2000) was an American jazz singer, poet and composer. Best known for a wide range of vocal styles she mastered, Lee collaborated with numerous distinguished composers and performers who included Gunter Hampel, Ran Blake, Carla Bley, Anthony Braxton, Marion Brown, Mal Waldron, and many others. [source]

Conspiracy  is recorded in New York, February, April and May, 1974. The album contains 8 different pieces: Sundance / Yeh Come T’ Be / Jamaica / Subway Couple / The Miracle / Your Ballad / Angel Chile / Conspiracy. The mucisians at the album are:  Mark Whitecage – Alto Clarinet / Jack Gregg – Bass / Allan Praskin – Clarinet / Perry Robinson – Clarinet / Steve McCall – Drums / Gunter Hampel – Flute, Piano, Vibraphone, Alto Clarinet, Bass Clarinet / Sam Rivers – Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Flute / Marty Cook – Trombone

Here is also first track from side B, The Miracle:

Lyrics printed on sleeve:

“The Miracle”

The miracle is… that the layers continue
to be stripped away each time uncov’ring
a center more brilliant and revealing
than the one before.

Amazing… that this should be the way
our love our knowledge and our lives
keep
unfolding
together
leaving us constantly renewed.

Knowing you exist anywhere in this universe
makes my world that much larger
and that much more filled
with light.

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