Miles Davis – My Ship (1957)

Evans combined the ten pieces that make up the album into a suite, each flowing into the next without interruption; the only exception to this rule was on the title track since it was placed last on side A (this has been corrected on the CD versions). Davis is the only soloist on Miles Ahead, which features a large ensemble consisting of sixteen woodwind and brass players. Art Taylor played drums on the sessions and the then current Miles Davis Quintet member Paul Chambers was the bassist. [source]

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[In remembrance of Miles Davis on his birthday]

Don Rendell & Ian Carr – Black Marigolds (1968)


Don Rendell Ian Carr from 1968 accompanied by Michael Garrick – Piano; Dave Green – Bass; Trevor Tomkins – Drums.
An essential piece of British jazz – end of story. [source]

Dave Green –  Bass
Trevor Tomkins – Drums
Michael Garrick – Piano
Don Rendell – Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute
Ian Carr – Trumpet, Flugelhorn

 

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Bill Dixon Orchestra – Nightfall Pieces I & II (1967)

Nightfall Pieces I & II is track 2 and 4 on the album Intents And Purposes by The Bill Dixon Orchestra.

Intents And Purposes has long been revered as Bill Dixon’s singular masterpiece.  Since his decisive involvement in 1964’s October Revolution in Jazz and lengthy tenure at Bennington College in Vermont (1968-1995), Dixon has been renowned for his skills as an organizer and an educator rather than his pioneering advancements as an instrumentalist and composer. As a former student of painting as well as music, Dixon’s conceptual organization of sound relies heavily on color, shade and texture, with a keen sensitivity to dynamics—aspects that quickly placed him at the creative forefront of the 1960s New Thing. Originally recorded for RCA when he was 42, Intents And Purposes was Dixon’s third album as a leader, following two efforts for Savoy in 1962 and 1964 that were co-led by tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp. [source]

Bill Dixon – Trumpet, Flugelhorn

George Marge – Flute

 

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The Bill Dixon Orchestra – Voices (1967)

From the album Intents and Purposes by  Bill Dixon, recorded Jan. 17, 1967 in New York City

Since his decisive involvement in 1964’s October Revolution in Jazz and lengthy tenure at Bennington College in Vermont (1968-1995), Dixon has been renowned for his skills as an organizer and an educator rather than his pioneering advancements as an instrumentalist and composer. As a former student of painting as well as music, Dixon’s conceptual organization of sound relies heavily on color, shade and texture, with a keen sensitivity to dynamics—aspects that quickly placed him at the creative forefront of the 1960s New Thing. Originally recorded for RCA when he was 42, Intents And Purposes was Dixon’s third album as a leader, following two efforts for Savoy in 1962 and 1964 that were co-led by tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp.

“Voices” pushes the aesthetic envelope even further, forming a startling alliance between austere classicism and the primal immediacy of ritualized rhythm. Performed by a string-heavy quintet, the lengthy piece features Dixon’s melancholy horn refrains and Lancaster’s otherworldly bass clarinet drifting over haunting string glissandi that eventually trade the sinuous sustain of legato melodies for the polyrhythmic power of tribal drumming. [source]

Bill Dixon – Trumpet, Flugelhorn
Catherine Norris – Cello
Jimmy Garrison – Bass
Robert Frank Pozar – Drums
Byard Lancaster – Bass clarinet

 

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Roscoe Mitchell / Roscoe Mitchell Sextet – Sound (1966)

Originally the album Sound by Roscoe Mitchell only had three tracks. The album was recorded at Sound Studios, Inc. August , 1966.

Sound, Roscoe Mitchell’s debut as a leader, was an early free jazz landmark and an enormously groundbreaking album in many respects. Historically, it marked the very first time that members of Chicago’s seminal AACM community appeared on record; it also showcased the early chemistry between future Art Ensemble of Chicago members Mitchell, Lester Bowie, and Malachi Favors. Arrangement-wise, it employed a number of instruments largely foreign to avant-garde jazz — not just cello and clarinet, but the AEC’s notorious “little instruments,” like recorder, whistle, harmonica, and assorted small percussion devices (gourds, maracas, bells, etc.), heard to best effect on the playful “Little Suite.” Structurally, Sound heralded a whole new approach to free improvisation; where most previous free jazz prized an unrelenting fever pitch of emotion, Sound was full of wide-open spaces between instruments, an agreeably rambling pace in between the high-energy climaxes, and a more abstract quality to its solos. Steady rhythmic pulses were mostly discarded in favor of collective, spontaneous dialogues and novel textures (especially with the less orthodox instruments, which had tremendous potential for flat-out weird noises). Simply put, it’s an exploration of pure sound. It didn’t so much break the rules as ignore them and make up its own, allowing the musicians’ imaginations to run wild (which is why it still sounds fresh today). Sound´s concepts of texture, space, and interaction would shortly be expanded upon in classic recordings by Anthony Braxton, Muhal Richard Abrams, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and others; the repercussions from its expansion of free jazz’s tonal and emotional palettes are still being felt. (Delmark’s CD reissue includes two takes of “Sound,” which were edited together to form the original LP version, and an alternate arrangement of the briefer free-bop tribute number “Ornette.”) [source]

All compositions by Roscoe Mitchell. Tracks on the CD reisue: 1. Ornette (alternative take) (5:44) / 2. Sound 1 (26:36) / 3. The Little Suite (10:27) / 4. Ornette  (5:29) / 5. Sound 2 (19:24)

Personnel:
Roscoe Mitchell – Alto saxophone, Clarinet, Flute
Lester Bowie – Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Harmonica
Malachi Favors – Bass
Maurice McIntyre – Tenor Saxophone
Lester Lashley – Trombone, Cello
Alvin Fielder – Percussion

The three first tracks from the CD-reisue:

 

 

 

Alan Shorter – Orgasm (1968)

Orgasm is the last track on the album Orgasm by Alan Shorter. Recorded and realeased on Verve Records in 1968.

Alan Shorter (May 29, 1932–1987) was a free jazz trumpet and flugelhorn player, and the older brother of composer and saxophone player Wayne Shorter.

In the mid-1960s Alan moved to Europe, leading his own avant-garde gigs in Geneva and Paris. His style of free jazz sometimes proved to be too far-out for European audiences (his brother remembered that Alan’s gigs in Europe would often end with him responding to the crowd’s boos by yelling, “You’re not ready for me yet!”) but he generally found European audiences more receptive than those in the U.S. [source]

1. Parabola (13:14) / 2. Joseph (3:14) / 3. Straits of Blagellan (6:23) /                                                4. Rapids (10:33) / 5. Outeroids (4:14) / 6. Orgasm (11:17)

Alan Shorter – flugelhorn. trumpet, tambourine
Gato Barbieri – tenor sax
Charlie Haden – bass (1 & 6)
Muhammad Ali – drums (1 & 6)

Reggie Johnson – bass (2, 3, 4 & 5) / Rashied Ali – drums (2, 3, 4 & 5)