Miles Davis – Lonely Fire (1970)

Lonely Fire is recorded 27 January 1970 in Columbia Studio B, and appears on the album Big Fun.

Lineup:  Miles Davis – trumpet / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Bennie Maupin – bass clarinet / Khalil Balakrishna – sitar, Indian instruments / Chick Corea – electric piano / Joe Zawinul – electric piano, Farfisa organ / Dave Holland – double bass / Harvey Brooks – Fender bass guitar / Jack DeJohnette – drums / Billy Cobham – drums / Airto Moreira – Indian instruments, percussion

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Sun Ra – The Magic City (1965)

The boundaries of Sun Ra’s self-proclaimed “space jazz” underwent a transformation in the mid-’60s. The Magic City is an aural snapshot of that metamorphic process. Many enthusiasts and scholars consider this to be among Ra’s most definitive studio recordings. [source]

Alto Saxophone – Harry Spencer / Alto Saxophone, Flute – Danny Davis / Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Piccolo Flute – Marshall Allen / Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Timpani – Pat Patrick / Bass – Ronnie Boykins / Bass Clarinet – Robert Cummings / Keyboards [Clavioline], Celesta [Electronic Celeste], Piano, Marimba [Bass], Harp [Sun Harp], Percussion [Dragon Drum], Timpani – Sun Ra / Percussion – Jimmi Johnson, Roger Blank / Tenor Saxophone – John Gilmore / Trombone – Ali Hassan, Bernard Pettaway, Teddy Nance / Trumpet – Chris Capers, Walter Miller

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Sun Ra – Friendly Galaxy (1965)

When you need to keep your brain and heart vibrating, just listen to Sun Ra and the smile will spread like wildfire. Friendly Galaxy is from the album Secrets of the Sun by Sun Ra and his Solar Arkestra, recorded at the Choreographers’ Workshop in 1962 in New York and released in 1965.

This is an interesting album for Ra fans because it’s such a small band and shows how new ideas were taking hold in the music, not to mention Gilmore’s use of bass clarinet, which he stopped playing completely sometime in the ’60s. [source]

Sun Ra – Harp, Piano, Gong / John Gilmore – Space Bird Sounds, Bass Clarinet, Tenor Sax, Drums, Percussion / Art Jenkins – Space Voice / Calvin Newborn – Guitar, Electric Guitar / Marshall Allen – Flute, Alto Saxophone, Percussion / Pat Patrick – Flute, Baritone Saxophone, Bongos / Eddie Gale – Trumpet / Al Evans – Flugelhorn / Ronnie Boykins – Bass / Tommy Hunter – Drums, Tape Effects / C. Scoby Stroman – Drums / Jimmy Johnson – Percussion

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Jeanne Lee – Yeh Come T’ Beh (1974)

Yeh Come T’ Beh is second track on the album Conspiracy by Jeanne Lee.

Jeanne Lee (January 29, 1939 – October 25, 2000) was an American jazz singer, poet and composer. Best known for a wide range of vocal styles she mastered, Lee collaborated with numerous distinguished composers and performers who included Gunter Hampel, Ran Blake, Carla Bley, Anthony Braxton, Marion Brown, Mal Waldron, and many others. [source]

Conspiracy  is recorded in New York, February, April and May, 1974. The album contains 8 different pieces: Sundance / Yeh Come T’ Be / Jamaica / Subway Couple / The Miracle / Your Ballad / Angel Chile / Conspiracy. The mucisians at the album are:  Mark Whitecage – Alto Clarinet / Jack Gregg – Bass / Allan Praskin – Clarinet / Perry Robinson – Clarinet / Steve McCall – Drums / Gunter Hampel – Flute, Piano, Vibraphone, Alto Clarinet, Bass Clarinet / Sam Rivers – Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Flute / Marty Cook – Trombone

Here is also first track from side B, The Miracle:

Lyrics printed on sleeve:

“The Miracle”

The miracle is… that the layers continue
to be stripped away each time uncov’ring
a center more brilliant and revealing
than the one before.

Amazing… that this should be the way
our love our knowledge and our lives
keep
unfolding
together
leaving us constantly renewed.

Knowing you exist anywhere in this universe
makes my world that much larger
and that much more filled
with light.

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Eric Dolphy – Springtime (1964)

Recorded live  in Paris, France, June 11, 1964. Originally released in 1988 on the album Last Recordings by Eric Dolphy and rereleased in 2010 on The Complete Last Recordings by Eric Dolphy. Eric Dolphy died 18 days after this recording and apparently it was the very last time he recorded at all.

Jacques Hess – Bass
Eric Dolphy – Bass Clarinet
Franco Monzecci – Drums
Jack Diéval – Piano
Nathan Davis – Tenor Saxophone
Donald Byrd – Trumpet

 

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Amiri Baraka, Leroi Jones With David Murray And Steve McCall – Class Struggle In Music I (1982)

From the album New Music – New Poetry, released in 1982.

As long as the black writer was obsessed with being an accepted, middle class, Baraka wrote, he would never be able to speak his mind, and that would always lead to failure. Baraka felt that America only made room for only white obfuscators, not black ones. [source]

An incendiary poet reads in performance with David Murray (tenor sax) and Steve McCall (drums). [source]

Steve McCall – Drums
David Murray – Tenor Saxophone, Bass Clarinet
Amiri Baraka – Vocals

 

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Eric Dolphy/Booker Little quintet – Aggression (1961)

Aggression is recorded July 16, 1961. It appears on the second of three sets that document the Eric Dolphy / Booker Little quintet’s playing at the Five Spot

At the Five Spot volumes one and two is a pair of jazz albums documenting one night (16 July 1961) from the end of Eric Dolphy and Booker Little’s two-week residency at the Five Spot in New York. This was the only night to be recorded; the engineer was Rudy Van Gelder. [source]

An excellent set that records what may have been Dolphy’s finest group ever, as well as one of that era’s best working bands. [source]

Eric Dolphy – alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute / Booker Little – trumpet / Mal Waldron – piano / Richard Davis – double bass / Ed Blackwell – drums

 

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