Miles Davis Quintet – Walkin (1965)

Walkin Appears on “The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965” (Columbia Legacy 1995). It is originally written by R. Carpenter.

Played live at the Plugged Nickel, First Set December 23, 1965 by:

Miles Davis – Trumpet / Wayne Shorter – Tenor Saxophone / Herbie Hancock – Piano / Ron Carter – Bass / Tony Williams – Drums.

Research for a Wayne Shorter biography revealed that drummer Tony Williams, during the plane ride to Chicago, challenged the rest of the band to play anti-jazz, in essence sabotaging the gig by playing whatever one wished rather than the standard versions. The band kept to the challenge, and the tunes were then radically altered for the Plugged Nickel performances. [source]

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Sun Ra – The Magic City (1965)

The boundaries of Sun Ra’s self-proclaimed “space jazz” underwent a transformation in the mid-’60s. The Magic City is an aural snapshot of that metamorphic process. Many enthusiasts and scholars consider this to be among Ra’s most definitive studio recordings. [source]

Alto Saxophone – Harry Spencer / Alto Saxophone, Flute – Danny Davis / Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Piccolo Flute – Marshall Allen / Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Timpani – Pat Patrick / Bass – Ronnie Boykins / Bass Clarinet – Robert Cummings / Keyboards [Clavioline], Celesta [Electronic Celeste], Piano, Marimba [Bass], Harp [Sun Harp], Percussion [Dragon Drum], Timpani – Sun Ra / Percussion – Jimmi Johnson, Roger Blank / Tenor Saxophone – John Gilmore / Trombone – Ali Hassan, Bernard Pettaway, Teddy Nance / Trumpet – Chris Capers, Walter Miller

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Nina Simone – Feeling Good (1965)

“Feeling Good” (also known as “Feelin’ Good”) is a song written by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse for the 1964 musical “The Roar Of The Greasepaint – The Smell Of The Crowd” and has since been recorded by many artists, including Muse, Sammy Davis Jr., Bobby Darin, Traffic, Michael Bublé, The Pussycat Dolls, George Michael, John Barrowman, John Coltrane, Toše Proeski, Frank Sinatra Jr., and Adam Lambert. Perhaps the most famous version was recorded by Nina Simone, and first appeared on her 1965 album “I Put A Spell On You”.

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John Coltrane – Consequences (1965)

Consequenses comes after Love on Coltranes fabulous album Meditations, recorded in Van Gelder Studio the 23rd of November 1965.

The year 1965 was a turning point in the life of John Coltrane. It was at this point that he crossed the line into the free jazz arena that he had been approaching since the early ’60s. Besides his landmark Ascension, no album better illustrates this than the awe-inspiring Meditations. [source]

If one expects music to be “pretty,” go buy some Kenny G. But surely Coltrane knew that Meditations and the other recordings he made during this period were anything but pretty. He was trying to do something else with music: to reach and touch and communicate human emotions, human conditions, of more importance, depth, and lasting significance than prettiness. Especially in his “late period,” he thought that his music meant something: he thought it performed a function that mattered. Of course, this sort of thing was in the air. Archie Shepp was lecturing in Down Beat, everyone was recording music about freedom, and it was hard not to have contempt for music that didn’t try to matter. [source]

All songs written by John Coltrane.

  1. “The Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost” – 12:51
  2. “Compassion” – 6:50
  3. “Love” – 8:09
  4. “Consequences” – 9:11
  5. “Serenity” – 3:28

John Coltrane – tenor saxophone / Pharoah Sanders – tenor saxophone / McCoy Tyner – piano / Jimmy Garrison – double bass / Elvin Jones – drums / Rashied Ali – drums

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Roland Kirk Quartet featuring Elvin Jones – Rip, Rig and Panic (1965)

Title track from the album Rip, Rig & Panic by The Roland Kirk Quartet, Featuring Elvin Jones.

The title of the album was explained by Kirk in the liner notes as follows: “Rip means Rip Van Winkle (or Rest in Peace?); it’s the way people, even musicians are. They’re asleep. Rig means like rigor mortis. That’s where a lot of peoples mind are. When they hear me doing things they didn’t think I could do they panic in their minds”. Kirk made a lot of references to pioneers of jazz. “No Tonic Pres” is a reference to Lester Young; “From Bechet, Byas, and Fats” is a homage to Sidney Bechet, Don Byas, and Fats Waller; and “Once in a While” was inspired by Clifford Brown. Kirk also mentioned the work of Edgar Varese, the compositions Poeme electronique and Ionisation, as inspiration for the album. [source]

Roland Kirk – Tenor Saxophone, Stritch, Manzello, Flute, Siren, Oboe, Castanets / Jaki Byard – Piano / Richard Davis – Bass / Elvin Jones – Drums

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