Miles Davis Quintet – Walkin (1965)

Walkin Appears on “The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965” (Columbia Legacy 1995). It is originally written by R. Carpenter.

Played live at the Plugged Nickel, First Set December 23, 1965 by:

Miles Davis – Trumpet / Wayne Shorter – Tenor Saxophone / Herbie Hancock – Piano / Ron Carter – Bass / Tony Williams – Drums.

Research for a Wayne Shorter biography revealed that drummer Tony Williams, during the plane ride to Chicago, challenged the rest of the band to play anti-jazz, in essence sabotaging the gig by playing whatever one wished rather than the standard versions. The band kept to the challenge, and the tunes were then radically altered for the Plugged Nickel performances. [source]

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Miles Davis – Lonely Fire (1970)

Lonely Fire is recorded 27 January 1970 in Columbia Studio B, and appears on the album Big Fun.

Lineup:  Miles Davis – trumpet / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Bennie Maupin – bass clarinet / Khalil Balakrishna – sitar, Indian instruments / Chick Corea – electric piano / Joe Zawinul – electric piano, Farfisa organ / Dave Holland – double bass / Harvey Brooks – Fender bass guitar / Jack DeJohnette – drums / Billy Cobham – drums / Airto Moreira – Indian instruments, percussion

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Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Free For All (1964)

Incredibly high energy level. Free For All is composed by Wayne Shorter and appears on the album Free For All, recorded in Van Gelder Studio in February 1964. Yay!

Shorter’s title track is one of the finest moments in the Jazz Messengers’ history. [source]

Lineup: Art Blakey – drums / Cedar Walton – piano / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Freddie Hubbard – trumpet / Curtis Fuller – trombone / Reggie Workman – bass

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Miles Davis – It’s About That Time (Live) (1970)

From Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970: It’s About that Time, recorded March 7, 1970, at the Fillmore East, NYC.

Live at the Fillmore East March 7, 1970: It’s About that Time is a live double album by Miles Davis. Sony Music Entertainment released the album in 2001, although the concert had previously circulated as a bootleg recording. The March 7, 1970 concert consisted of two sets, each of which is presented on one compact disc. [source]

 

Miles Davis – trumpet / Wayne Shorter – soprano and tenor saxophone / Chick Corea – Fender Rhodes electric piano / Dave Holland – acoustic and electric bass / Jack DeJohnette – drums / Airto Moreira – percussion, cuica

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Miles Davis Quintet – Freedom Jazz Dance (1966)

Freedom Jazz Dance, written by Eddie Harris, is the second track on the B-side of the album Miles Smiles  by Miles Davis Quintet.

Miles Smiles is an album by jazz musician Miles Davis, released in January 1967 on Columbia Records. It was recorded by Davis and his second quintet at Columbia 30th Street Studio in New York City on October 24 and October 25, 1966. It is the second of five albums recorded by Davis’s second great quintet, which featured saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams. [source]

Miles Davis – Trumpet
Wayne Shorter – Tenor Saxophone
Herbie Hancock – Piano
Ron Carter – Double Bass
Tony Williams – Drums

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Graham Moncur III – Some Other Stuff (1964) (full album)

According to Moncur, “Gnostic”, a free jazz piece “which eliminates a pulsating meter”, should represent the achievement of salvation through the expression of knowledge and wisdom. “Thandiwa” means “beloved one” in the Zulu language, and it is the least experimental track of the album.With “The Twins”, built off only one chord, he wanted to portrait his twin brothers; he considered the rhythm the focal point of the composition.”Nomadic” is centered on a drum solo by Tony Williams. [source]

Graham Moncur III was one of the top trombonists of the jazz avant-garde in the 1960s although he had only a few chances to lead his own record sessions. This 1964 set (which has been reissued on CD) was one of his finest, a quintet outing with bassist Cecil McBee, two of the members of the Miles Davis Quintet (pianist Herbie Hancock and drummer Tony Williams), and tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter  just a brief time before he joined Miles. The group performs four of Moncur´s challenging originals, including “Nomadic” (which is largely a drum solo) and “The Twins,” which is built off of one chord. None of the compositions caught on but the strong and very individual improvising of the young musicians is enough of a reason to acquire the advanced music. [source]

Tracks: Gnostic  (11:46) / Thandiwa (8:21) / The Twins (12:55) / Nomadic ( 7:43)

Line up:
Cecil McBee – Bass
Anthony Williams – Drums
Herbie Hancock – Piano
Wayne Shorter – Tenor Saxophone
Grachan Moncur III – Trombone

 

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