Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Free For All (1964)

Incredibly high energy level. Free For All is composed by Wayne Shorter and appears on the album Free For All, recorded in Van Gelder Studio in February 1964. Yay!

Shorter’s title track is one of the finest moments in the Jazz Messengers’ history. [source]

Lineup: Art Blakey – drums / Cedar Walton – piano / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Freddie Hubbard – trumpet / Curtis Fuller – trombone / Reggie Workman – bass

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John Coltrane – Ascension (1965)

“I want to be a force for real good. In other words. I know that there are bad forces, forces that bring suffering to others and misery to the world, but I want to be the opposite force. I want to be the force which is truly for good.” – John Coltrane

Timed at around 40 minutes, this can be a difficult listen at first, but with a patient ear and an appreciation for the finer things in life, the reward is a greater understanding of the personal path that the artist was on at that particular time in his development. Coltrane was always on an unceasing mission for personal expansion through the mouthpiece of his horn, but by the time of this recording he had begun to reach the level of “elder statesman” and to find other voices (Shepp, Sanders, and Marion Brown) to propel and expand his sounds and emotions. Therefore, Ascension reflects more of an event rather than just a jazz record and should be sought out by either experienced jazz appreciators or other open-minded listeners, but not by unsuspecting bystanders. [source]

John Coltrane – Tenor Saxophone
Freddie Hubbard – Trumpet
Dewey Johnson – Trumpet
Marion Brown – Alto Saxophone
John Tchicai – Alto Saxophone
Pharoah Sanders – Tenor Saxophone
Archie Shepp – Tenor Saxophone
McCoy Tyner – Piano
Art Davis – Bass
Jimmy Garrison – Bass
Elvin Jones – Drums

 

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Eric Dolphy – Something Sweet, Something Tender (1964)

Second track on the album Out to Lunch by Eric Dolphy.

Much has been written about Dolphy’s odd time signatures, wide-interval leaps, and flirtations with atonality. And those preoccupations reach their peak on Out to Lunch, which is less rooted in bop tradition than anything Dolphy had ever done.  [source]

Eric Dolphy – flute, alto saxophone / Freddie Hubbard – trumpet / Bobby Hutcherson – vibraphone / Richard Davis – bass / Anthony Williams – drums

 

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Herbie Hancock – Maiden Voyage (Full Album) (1965)

Maiden Voyage is the fifth album led by jazz musician Herbie Hancock, and was recorded by Rudu Van Gelder on May 17, 1965 for Blue Note Records. It was issued as BLP 4195 and BST 84195. It is a concept album aimed at creating an oceanic atmosphere. Many of the song titles refer to marine biology or the sea, and the musicians develop the concept through their use of space and almost tidal dynamics. The album was presented with the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1999. According to Bob Blumenthal’s 1999 liner notes, “Blue Note logs indicate that an attempt had been made to record “Maiden Voyage”, “Little One” and “Dolphin Dance” six days earlier, with Hubbard on cornet and Stu Martin in place of Williams. Those performances were rejected at the time and have been lost in the ensuing years.” [source]

All compositions by Herbie Hancock:
Maiden Voyage (7:53)
The Eye of the Hurricane (5:57)
Little One (8:43)
Survival of the Fittest (9:59)
Dolphin Dance (9:16)

Personnel:
Herbie Hancock — Piano
Freddie Hubbard — Trumpet
George Coleman — Tenor saxophone
Ron Carter — Bass
Tony Williams — drums

 

Oliver Nelson – Stolen Moments (1961)

The Blues and the Abstract Truth is a jazz album by Oliver Nelson recorded in February 1961. It remains Nelson’s most acclaimed album. It features a lineup of notable musicians: Freddie Hubbard, Eric Dolphy (his last appearance on a Nelson album following a series of collaborations recorded for Prestige), Bill Evans (his only appearance with Nelson), Paul Chambers and Roy Haynes. Baritone saxophonist George Barrow does not take a solo but is a key feature of the subtle voicings of Nelson’s arrangements. The album is an exploration of the mood and structure of the blues, though only some of the tracks are in conventional 12-bar blues form. In this regard, though it is not modal jazz, it may be seen as a continuation of the trend towards greater harmonic simplicity and subtlety via reimagined versions of the blues that was instigated by Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue in 1959 (Evans and Chambers played on both albums). Of the pieces on Nelson’s album, “Stolen Moments” is the most famous; it is a sixteen-bar piece (in an eight-six-two pattern), though the solos are on a conventional 12-bar minor-key blues structure in C minor. “Hoe-Down” is built on a forty-four-bar structure (with thirty-two-bar solos based on “rhythm changes”).




[via Ole Wennike]