Eric Dolphy and Charles Mingus – Stormy Weather (1960)

At this time Mingus was working regularly with a piano-less quartet featuring Eric Dolphy, Ted Curson and Dannie Richmond, as heard on the Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus album also recorded in November 1960. The Mingus album features one track, “Stormy Weather”, recorded by the same quartet, plus two tracks recorded by a larger group featuring piano and additional horns. [source]

Charles Mingus – Bass
Eric Dolphy – Alto sax
Ted Curson – Trumpet
Dannie Richmond – Drums

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Charles Mingus – Love Chant (1956)

Pithecanthropus Erectus is a 1956 album by jazz composer and bassist Charles Mingus. Mingus noted that this was the first album where he taught arrangements to his musicians by ear in lieu of writing everything down. [source]

Tracks on Pithecanthropus Erectus: 1. Pithecanthropus Erectus – 10:36 / 2. A Foggy Day – 7:50 (George Gershwin) / 3. Profile of Jackie” – 3:11 / 4. Love Chant – 14:59

Line up: Charles Mingus – Bass / Jackie McLean – Alto Saxophone / J. R. Monterose – Tenor Saxophone / Mal Waldron – Piano / Willie Jones – Drums

 

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Charles Mingus – Passions Of A Man (1961)

Passions Of A Man is from the album Oh Yeah by Charles Mingus.

Mingus had always had a bizarre sense of humor, as expressed in some of his song titles and arranging devices, but Oh Yeah often gets downright warped. That’s partly because Mingus is freed up to vocalize more often, but it’s also due to the presence of mad genius Roland Kirk. His chemistry with Mingus is fantastically explosive, which makes sense — both were encyclopedias of jazz tradition, but given over to oddball modernist experimentation. “Passions of a Man” sounds almost like musique concrète, while “Wham Bam Thank You Ma’am” nicks some Monk angularity and “Ecclusiastics” adds some testifying shouts and a chorale-like theme to Mingus’ gospel-jazz hybrid. Og Yeah is probably the most offbeat Mingus album ever, and that’s what makes it so vital. [source]

Charles Mingus – Piano, Vocals
Rahsaan Roland Kirk – Flute, Siren, Tenor Saxophone, Manzello, Strich
Booker Ervin – Tenor Saxophone
Jimmy Knepper – Trombone
Doug Watkins – Bass
Dannie Richmond – Drums

 

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Charles Mingus – Myself When I Am Real (1963)

Myself when I’m real is the opening track on the album Mingus Plays Piano by Charles Mingus, recorded and released in 1963.

Mingus Plays Piano is a 1963 solo jazz album by Charles Mingus. The album is notable for Mingus’ departure from his usual role as composer and double-bassist in ensemble recordings, instead playing piano without any additional musicians. [source]

This is not a performing seal act. This isn’t even Ornette on violin. Mingus Plays Piano is no gimmick or avant-garde foolery, because Mingus can really play piano.

Really play piano. On the Atlantic album Oh Yeah his piano fronts a band including Rahsaan Roland Kirk in a rollicking set; his comping there is competent but undistinguished. Nothing prepared the world for Mingus Plays Piano, except, perhaps, the unpredictable genius of Mr. Mingus himself.

If this was even just a seven-and-a-half minute album, it would be worth the price for the opening cut, “Myself When I Am Real.” To what can Mingus’ piano playing be compared? “Myself When I Am Real” sounds like Debussy plays Bill Evans, or maybe it’s the other way around. The piece is tender and emotional, as strong in its own way as The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady but a good bit more introverted. [source]

Charles Mingus – Piano

 

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Charles Mingus & Max Roach – Percussion Discussion (1955)

From the album Mingus At The Bohemia by Charles Mingus, recorded at Cafe Bohemia, New York City, December 23, 1955.

The songs from “Cafe Bohemia” contain the typical Mingus “Jazz Workshop” characteristics. A concert as work shop meant first of all a live experiment; this is mainly true for his “guest” musician Max Roach in “Percussion Discussion”. Mingus at the Bohemia fixed a moment in time where Mingus found his musical identity.

The above mentioned “Percussion Discussion” is a duet of Mingus and Roach, which was later also used in the Epitaph suite.  Just two men playing two instruments that are very rarely found on the stand alone. Two men producing and assortment of rich and exciting sounds. Here is a chance to really enjoy the artistry of Max and Mingus. Notice the clean, true snare sound that Max gets on his highest pitched drum. As he moves from snare drum to tom-tom, there is no doubt that he’s changed intentionally. No muddled indistinct sound here but a real fresh, swinging sound for Max. And he has his earthly qualities too: strong, vigorous, earthy qualities. Mingus is tremendous, matching Max mood for mood. His pizzicato becomes so strong at times that it sounds very close to Max’s percussive effort. Also, for a new concept in jazz sounds, listen to the high, scraping sound Mingus gets on his bass immediately after Max’s cymbal entrance. [source]

Charles Mingus – Bass / Max Roach – Drums

 

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