Jimmy Giuffre, Paul Bley and Steve Swallow – Stretching Out (1961)

Stretching Out is from the album Emphasis & Flight by Jimmy Giuffre, Paul Bley and Steve Swallow, recorded 7th and 23rd November, 1961 in Germany.

At a time when the leading edge of mainstream jazz was pulling through modal jazz into hard bop, Jimmy Giuffre was headed in another direction. His early trios were simultaneously polite and experimental, an unusual combination that revealed both his cool roots and his fearlessness in stepping over the cliff. Nowhere were these qualities more evident than on his early-’60s trio records alongside pianist Paul Bley and bassist Steve Swallow. [source]

Jimmy Giuffre – Clarinet
Paul Bley – Piano
Steve Swallow – Double Bass


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Eric Dolphy/Booker Little quintet – Aggression (1961)

Aggression is recorded July 16, 1961. It appears on the second of three sets that document the Eric Dolphy / Booker Little quintet’s playing at the Five Spot

At the Five Spot volumes one and two is a pair of jazz albums documenting one night (16 July 1961) from the end of Eric Dolphy and Booker Little’s two-week residency at the Five Spot in New York. This was the only night to be recorded; the engineer was Rudy Van Gelder. [source]

An excellent set that records what may have been Dolphy’s finest group ever, as well as one of that era’s best working bands. [source]

Eric Dolphy – alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute / Booker Little – trumpet / Mal Waldron – piano / Richard Davis – double bass / Ed Blackwell – drums

 

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Charles Mingus – Passions Of A Man (1961)

Passions Of A Man is from the album Oh Yeah by Charles Mingus.

Mingus had always had a bizarre sense of humor, as expressed in some of his song titles and arranging devices, but Oh Yeah often gets downright warped. That’s partly because Mingus is freed up to vocalize more often, but it’s also due to the presence of mad genius Roland Kirk. His chemistry with Mingus is fantastically explosive, which makes sense — both were encyclopedias of jazz tradition, but given over to oddball modernist experimentation. “Passions of a Man” sounds almost like musique concrète, while “Wham Bam Thank You Ma’am” nicks some Monk angularity and “Ecclusiastics” adds some testifying shouts and a chorale-like theme to Mingus’ gospel-jazz hybrid. Og Yeah is probably the most offbeat Mingus album ever, and that’s what makes it so vital. [source]

Charles Mingus – Piano, Vocals
Rahsaan Roland Kirk – Flute, Siren, Tenor Saxophone, Manzello, Strich
Booker Ervin – Tenor Saxophone
Jimmy Knepper – Trombone
Doug Watkins – Bass
Dannie Richmond – Drums

 

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Mal Waldron with Eric Dolphy – Warm Canto (1961)

Recorded 27 June 1961. From the album The Quest.

The Quest is an album by American jazz pianist Mal Waldron recorded in 1961 and released on the New Jazz label. Some reissues of the album appear under Eric Dolphy´s name. [source]

Joe Benjamin – Bass
Ron Carter – Cello
Eric Dolphy – Clarinet, Alto Saxophone
Charlie Persip – Drums
Mal Waldron – Piano

 

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Booker Little – Moods In Free Time (1961)

Moods In Free Time is from the album Out Front by Booker Little, recorded in New York, spring 1961, and first released on Candid ame year.

Booker Little was the first trumpet soloist to emerge in jazz after the death of Clifford Brown to have his own sound. His tragically brief life (he died at age 23 later in 1961) cut short what would have certainly been a major career. Little, on this sextet date with multi-reedist Eric Dolphy, trombonist Julian Priester, and drummer Max Roach, shows that his playing was really beyond bebop. His seven now-obscure originals (several of which deserve to be revived) are challenging for the soloists and there are many strong moments during these consistently challenging and satisfying performances. [source]

Booker Little – Trumpet
Eric Dolphy – Alt Saxophone, Flute, Bass Clarinet
Ron Carter – Bass
Julian Priester – Trombone
Max Roach – Drums, Vibraphone
Don Friedman – Piano

 

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