Fred Hersch – So In Love (2001)

From the album Songs Without Words by Fred Hersch. “So In Love” is composed by Cole Porter.
Fred Hersch – Piano

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[Dedicated my german friends MB & DV]

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Miles Davis Quintet – Walkin (1965)

Walkin Appears on “The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965” (Columbia Legacy 1995). It is originally written by R. Carpenter.

Played live at the Plugged Nickel, First Set December 23, 1965 by:

Miles Davis – Trumpet / Wayne Shorter – Tenor Saxophone / Herbie Hancock – Piano / Ron Carter – Bass / Tony Williams – Drums.

Research for a Wayne Shorter biography revealed that drummer Tony Williams, during the plane ride to Chicago, challenged the rest of the band to play anti-jazz, in essence sabotaging the gig by playing whatever one wished rather than the standard versions. The band kept to the challenge, and the tunes were then radically altered for the Plugged Nickel performances. [source]

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Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Free For All (1964)

Incredibly high energy level. Free For All is composed by Wayne Shorter and appears on the album Free For All, recorded in Van Gelder Studio in February 1964. Yay!

Shorter’s title track is one of the finest moments in the Jazz Messengers’ history. [source]

Lineup: Art Blakey – drums / Cedar Walton – piano / Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone / Freddie Hubbard – trumpet / Curtis Fuller – trombone / Reggie Workman – bass

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David S. Ware Quartet – Freedom Suite I. (2002)

From the album Freedom Suite by David S. Ware Quartet. Recorded on July 13, 2002 at Systems Two Studio, Brooklyn.

Composed by Sonny Rollins, arranged by David S. Ware.
David S. Ware – tenor sax
Matthew Shipp – piano
William Parker – bass
Guillermo E. Brown – drums

Recorded by Jim Anderson

Tracks on album: Freedom Suite Movement 1 / Interlude / Freedom Suite Movement 2 / Freedom Suite Movement 3

Sonny Rollin’s Freedom Suite (first issued on the Riverside album of the same name) is a protest jazz masterpiece, albeit one relegated to a back seat behind works by Charles Mingus, Max Roach, and even John Coltrane by some critics. There are several reasons for this. Despite being inspired by Rollins’ first-hand experience of housing discrimination in New York, it was recorded in early 1958, and released before the Civil Rights Movement reached critical mass nationally.

The upshot is that “The Freedom Suite” is a natural, if overlooked reservoir for tenor saxophonists of David S. Ware’s generation. Obviously Ware has long been well aware of the piece, having studied with Rollins before his mid-70s emergence. Yet it is somewhat surprising for Ware to give the piece a CD length reading, as so little of Rollins’ influence is detectable even in Ware’s earliest recordings (the notable exception being his take on Kurt Weill’s “My Ship” on drummer Andrew Cyrille’s 1978 Black Saint album Metamusician’s Stomp). Instead, Ware quickly established a sound extrapolating the Fire Music nexus of spiritual and visceral intensities, placing little to no stock in Rollins’ romanticism, humour, and interest in pop music. – Bill Shoemaker, The Wire [source]

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Sun Ra – The Magic City (1965)

The boundaries of Sun Ra’s self-proclaimed “space jazz” underwent a transformation in the mid-’60s. The Magic City is an aural snapshot of that metamorphic process. Many enthusiasts and scholars consider this to be among Ra’s most definitive studio recordings. [source]

Alto Saxophone – Harry Spencer / Alto Saxophone, Flute – Danny Davis / Alto Saxophone, Flute, Oboe, Piccolo Flute – Marshall Allen / Baritone Saxophone, Flute, Timpani – Pat Patrick / Bass – Ronnie Boykins / Bass Clarinet – Robert Cummings / Keyboards [Clavioline], Celesta [Electronic Celeste], Piano, Marimba [Bass], Harp [Sun Harp], Percussion [Dragon Drum], Timpani – Sun Ra / Percussion – Jimmi Johnson, Roger Blank / Tenor Saxophone – John Gilmore / Trombone – Ali Hassan, Bernard Pettaway, Teddy Nance / Trumpet – Chris Capers, Walter Miller

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