Eric Dolphy/Booker Little quintet – Aggression (1961)

Aggression is recorded July 16, 1961. It appears on the second of three sets that document the Eric Dolphy / Booker Little quintet’s playing at the Five Spot

At the Five Spot volumes one and two is a pair of jazz albums documenting one night (16 July 1961) from the end of Eric Dolphy and Booker Little’s two-week residency at the Five Spot in New York. This was the only night to be recorded; the engineer was Rudy Van Gelder. [source]

An excellent set that records what may have been Dolphy’s finest group ever, as well as one of that era’s best working bands. [source]

Eric Dolphy – alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute / Booker Little – trumpet / Mal Waldron – piano / Richard Davis – double bass / Ed Blackwell – drums

 

MI0001774684

Advertisements

Booker Little – Moods In Free Time (1961)

Moods In Free Time is from the album Out Front by Booker Little, recorded in New York, spring 1961, and first released on Candid ame year.

Booker Little was the first trumpet soloist to emerge in jazz after the death of Clifford Brown to have his own sound. His tragically brief life (he died at age 23 later in 1961) cut short what would have certainly been a major career. Little, on this sextet date with multi-reedist Eric Dolphy, trombonist Julian Priester, and drummer Max Roach, shows that his playing was really beyond bebop. His seven now-obscure originals (several of which deserve to be revived) are challenging for the soloists and there are many strong moments during these consistently challenging and satisfying performances. [source]

Booker Little – Trumpet
Eric Dolphy – Alt Saxophone, Flute, Bass Clarinet
Ron Carter – Bass
Julian Priester – Trombone
Max Roach – Drums, Vibraphone
Don Friedman – Piano

 

littleBookerCandid

Max Roach – Driva´ Man (1960)

Driva Man is the first track on the album We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite.

We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite is a jazz album released on Candid Records in 1960. It contains a suite which Max Roach and lyricist Oscar Brown had begun to develop in 1959 with a view to its performance in 1963 on the centennial of the Emancioation Proclamation. The cover references the sit-in movement of the Civil Rights Movement. The Penguin Guide to Jazz has awarded the album one of its rare crown accolades, in addition to featuring it as part of its Core Collection.

The music consists of five selections concerning the Emancipation Proclamation and the growing African independence movements of the 1950s. [source]

James Schenck (Bass) / Michael Olatuniji (Congas) / Max Roach (Drums) / Walter Benton (Tenor Saxophone) / Coleman Hawkins (Tenor Saxophone) / Julian Priester (Trombone) / Booker Little (Trumpet) / Abbey Lincoln (Vocals)

 

and here a live version from 1964:

Abbey Lincoln – Vocals
Clifford Jordan – Tenor Saxophone
Coleridge Perkinson – Piano
Eddie Khan – Bass
Max Roach – Drums

Max Roach featuring Abbey Lincoln – Freedom Day (1960)

We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite is a jazz album released on Candid Records in 1960. It contains a suite which Max Roach and lyricist Oscar Brown had begun to develop in 1959 with a view to its performance in 1963 on the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. The cover references the sit-in movement of the Civil Rights Movement. The Penguin Guide to Jazz has awarded the album one of its rare crown accolades, in addition to featuring it as part of its Core Collection. The music consists of five selections concerning the Emancipation Proclamation and the growing African independence movements of the 1950s. Only Roach and Lincoln perform on all five tracks, and one track features a guest cameo by one of the inventors of jazz saxophone playing, Coleman Hawkins.

Max Roach — drums
Abbey Lincoln — vocals
Booker Little — trumpet on “Driva Man,” “Freedom Day,” “All Africa,” and “Tears for Johannesburg”
Julian Priester — trombone on “Driva Man,” “Freedom Day,” and “Tears for Johannesburg”
Walter Benton — tenor saxophone on “Driva Man,” “Freedom Day,” and “Tears for Johannesburg”
Coleman Hawkins — tenor saxophone solo on “Driva Man”
James Schenk — bass on “Driva Man,” “Freedom Day,” and “Tears for Johannesburg”
Michael Olatunji — congas, vocal on side two
Raymond Mantilla, Tomas du Vall — percussion on side two