Louis Armstrong- Skeleton in the closet (1936)

From the American musical comedy movie from 1936, Pennies from Heaven directed by Norman Z. McLeod.

Teddy Buckner – Trumpet
Fletcher Galloway – Trumpet
Allen Durham – Trombone
Arcima Taylor – Reeds
Caughey Roberts – Clarinet, Alt saxophone
Bumps Myers – Tenor Saxophone
Ramon LaRue – Piano
Wesley Prince – Acoustic Double Bass
Lionel Hampton – Drums

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Wayne Shorter – Juju (1964)

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JuJu is the fifth album by Wayne Shorter, recorded and released on Blue Note in 1964, issued as BLP 4182 and BST 84182. The album shows the strong influence of John Coltrane, with whom Shorter had studied as an undergraduate, and whose style is reflected here both in performance and composition: Shorter’s timbre is rather astringent, and his phrases are long and volatile; neither quality is typical of his later work. “Yes or No” is reminiscent harmonically of Coltrane’s “Moment’s Notice” from Blue Train; and “House of Jade”, like later Shorter ballads (including “Infant Eyes” from Speak No Evil) is similar in melody and structure to “Naima”. The personnel also reflects Coltrane’s influence, consisting essentially of a version of the latter’s classic quartet, with McCoy Tyner on piano, Elvin Jones on drums, and Reggie Workman on bass (who is mixed very low on this album). The same rhythm section backed Coltrane on the 1961 album Africa/Brass, the title track of which anticipates the title track of this album. By Shorter’s next album, Speak No Evil, recorded later in 1964, the leader’s phrases became briefer, softer, and more rounded, under the influence of Sonny Rollins and Miles Davis, his employer at the time, and Tyner was replaced by Shorter’s Davis bandmate, Herbie Hancock.

Jeanne Lee & Ran Blake – Worry Now Later (1989)

From the CD You Stepped out of a Cloud by Jeanne Lee and Ran Blake, recorded, August the 11th, 1989. Originally Worry Now Later is composed by Thelonious Monk.

In 1961, both pianist Ran Blake and singer Jeanne Lee (helped out on two cuts by bassist George Duvivier) made their recording debut with a set of coolly emotional duets. Nearly 28 years later, they had a reunion for this Owl CD, showing the musical growth they had experienced while still sounding quite recognizable; both had found their own musical paths early on. Half of the numbers on the set are originals (including Lee’s “I Like Your Style”), but it is generally the fresh renditions of standards that are most memorable, including a haunting “You Stepped Out of a Dream,” “Where Are You,” “You Go to My Head” and “Alone Together.” Blake and Lee should work together more often. [source]

Ran Blake – Piano / Jeanne Lee – Vocals

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